Electrical Engineering

Most electrical engineers will understand basic circuit theory (that is the interactions of elements such as resistors, capacitors, diodes, transistors, and instructors in a circuit), the theories employed by engineers generally depend upon the work they do. For example, quantum mechanics and solid state physics might be relevant to an engineer working on VLSI (the design of integrated circuits), but are largely irrelevant to engineers working with macroscopic electrical systems. Even circuit theory may not be relevant to a person designing telecommunication systems that use off-the-shelf components.

At many schools, electronic engineering is included as part of an electrical award, sometimes explicitly, such as a Bachelor of Engineering (Electrical and Electronic), but in others electrical and electronic engineering are both considered to be sufficiently broad and complex that separate degrees are offered.

Electrical engineering

ABOUT

Electrical engineering is a professional engineering discipline that generally deals with the study and application of electricity, electronics, and electromagnetism. This field first became an identifiable occupation in the later half of the 19th century after commercialization of the electric telegraph, the telephone, and electric power distribution and use.
The invention of the transistor, and later the integrated circuit, brought down the cost of electronics to the point they can be used in almost any household object.

Reasons To Study

  1. Electrical Engineering students find their first job fairly easily
  2. Working as an electrical engineer creates lots of opportunities in other countries.
  3. Electricity won’t be your only focus

  4. Some of these sectors include:

    · Consumer goods

    ·Automotive

    ·Aerospace/aeronautical

    · Construction Chemical

    · Consultancy

    · Electrical/Electronics/Instruments

    ·  Medical imaging and monitoring